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    • 22 Oct 2021
    • 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Online
    Register


    Image Credit: Linda Briskin

    Locked in by lockdown leads to unlocking artistic expression. Don’t let COVID keep you down as you savour the creative energies of Club composers in our opening concert, featuring chamber and vocal works by Erika Yost, Jana Skarecky, Kye Marshall, Dorothy de Val and Maria Soulis, performed by Club members and friends.

    This is a prerecorded concert. The recording will go live at 7:30 pm on Friday, October 22 and be available for 8 days. The cost is $10 for Heliconian members and $15 for the public, including tax. 


    • 25 Oct 2021
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Heliconian Hall
    • 9
    Register

    Monday Life Drawing – Welcome Back!

    The convenors and the Club have devised a plan, to provide a safe, accessible environment for participants and models while adhering to current COVID-19 regulations. 

    Our Plan 

    Dates:  Monday October 18, 2021 thru Monday December 13, 2021.

    Time:   10 am – 1 pm. (3 hours, no lunch break). The hall will open at 9:30am.  The doors will be locked at 9:55 am so we can start at 10 am sharp. Come early.  There is a screening process. BRING PROOF** OF DOUBLE VAC AND ID EACH TIME.

    Price:  Members $17; Non-members $20.  The price reflects rising costs associated with smaller number of participants, additional COVID-related work and model fees. Purchase of a pass at this time is not available.

    Mandatory on-line registration and payment:  Heliconian members register the Tuesday or Wednesday before the Monday session, after which registration is open to the public until Sunday. No walk-ins allowed.  Registration for the Monday October 18 session starts Tuesday October 12, 2021.  Visit the Heliconian website: https://www.heliconianclub.org/life-drawing.html

    Fixed work stations:  There are only 15 work stations with drawing boards, most with two chairs, three with an easel and chair.  Upon arrival, proceed to a station and set up your materials. Physical distancing is required.

    Hall set-up:  Staff is responsible for set up and teardown.  The model stage is in the centre of the hall.  Our main floor washroom is for everyone’s use. Entry to the hall is through the front door facing Hazelton. The side door entry, office, boardroom and basement - including the washrooms - are out of bounds.  

    Masks:  Participants MUST wear a mask at all times when in the hall.  The model must wear a mask unless we use the screens between model and participants. Our model must feel comfortable during the session. 

    Breaks:  Refreshments will not be provided.  Participants may bring their own drinks and snacks, but consume them outdoors.   There is a filtered water dispenser installed outside the main floor washroom. Bring your own container.

    **proof of full series of COVID 19 vaccine or combination of COVID-19 vaccines approved by World Health Organization received at least 14 days before the event, as well as ID that contains your date of birth and your name matching the vaccine receipt. If vaccinated in Ontario, only proof of SECOND shot required. Vaccinated elsewhere - bring proof of all shots.



    • 28 Oct 2021
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    At the center of Foregone is famed Canadian American leftist documentary filmmaker, Leonard Fife, one of sixty thousand draft evaders and deserters who fled to Canada to avoid serving in Vietnam. Fife, now in his late seventies, is dying of cancer in Montreal and has agreed to a final interview in which he is determined to bare all his secrets at last, to demythologize his mythologized life. The interview is filmed by his acolyte and ex–star student, Malcolm MacLeod, in the presence of Fife’s wife and alongside Malcolm’s producer, cinematographer, and sound technician, all of whom have long admired Fife but who must now absorb the meaning of his astonishing, dark confession.
                Imaginatively structured around Fife’s secret memories and alternating between the experiences of the characters who are filming his confession, the novel challenges our assumptions and understanding about a significant lost chapter in American history and the nature of memory itself. Russell Banks gives us a daring and resonant work about the scope of one man’s mysterious life, revealed through the fragments of his recovered past. 

    Sandra Martin will interview Russell Banks.

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 9 Nov 2021
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    A brilliant and bitingly funny collection of stories united around a single crumbling apartment building in Ukraine. A bureaucratic glitch omits an entire building, along with its residents, from municipal records. So begins Reva's "darkly hilarious" (Anthony Doerr) intertwined narratives, nine stories that span the chaotic years leading up to and immediately following the fall of the Soviet Union. But even as the benighted denizens of 1933 Ivansk Street weather the official neglect of the increasingly powerless authorities, they devise ingenious ways to survive.
                In "Bone Music," an agoraphobic recluse survives by selling contraband LPs, mapping the vinyl grooves of illegal Western records into stolen X-ray film. A delusional secret service agent in "Letter of Apology" becomes convinced he's being covertly recruited to guard Lenin's tomb, just as his parents, not seen since he was a small child, supposedly were. Weaving the narratives together is the unforgettable, chameleon-like Zaya: a cleft-lipped orphan in "Little Rabbit," a beauty-pageant crasher in "Miss USSR," a sadist-for-hire to the Eastern Bloc's newly minted oligarchs in "Homecoming." 

    Finalist for the 2020 Writer’s Trust Prize for Fiction

    Professor Suanne Kelman will interview Maria Reva.

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Tuesday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 


    • 25 Nov 2021
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    A debut novel in the tradition of Zadie Smith and Marlon James, from a brilliant Caribbean writer, set in Barbados, about four people each desperate to escape their legacy of violence in a so-called "paradise."
                In Baxter Beach, Barbados, moneyed ex-pats clash with the locals who often end up serving them: braiding their hair, minding their children, and selling them drugs. Lala lives on the beach with her husband, Adan, a petty criminal with endless charisma whose thwarted burglary of one of the Baxter Beach mansions sets off a chain of events with terrible consequences.

                A gunshot no one was meant to witness. A new mother whose baby is found lifeless on the beach. A woman torn between two worlds and incapacitated by grief. And two men driven by desperation and greed who attempt a crime that will risk their freedom -- and their lives.

    Good Morning America's Bookclub pick for February, 2021. 

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 11 Jan 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    But I had known since forever that it's colours that keep the world turning, that keep a person going.

                One glimpse of the tiny painted house that folk art legend, Maud Lewis, shared with her husband, Everett, in Marshalltown, Nova Scotia, during the mid-twentieth century and the startling contrast between her joyful artwork and her life's deprivations is evident. One glimpse at her photo and you realize, for all her smile's shyness, she must've been one tough cookie. But, beneath her iconic resilience, who was Maud, really? How did she manage, holed up in that one-room house with no running water, married to a miserly man known for his drinking? Was she happy, or was she miserable? Did painting save or make her Everett's meal ticket? And then there are the darker secrets that haunt her story: the loss of her parents, her child, her first love.

                Against all odds, Maud Lewis rose above these constraints—and this is where you'll find the Maud of Brighten the Corner Where You Are: speaking her mind from beyond the grave, freed of the stigmas of gender, poverty, and disability that marked her life and shaped her art. Unfettered and feisty as can be, she tells her story her way, illuminating the darkest corners of her life. In possession of a voice all her own, Maud demonstrates the agency that hovers within us all.

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Tuesday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 


    • 27 Jan 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    All Amanda Jetté Knox ever wanted was to enjoy a stable life. She never knew her biological father, and while her mother and stepfather were loving parents, the situation was sometimes chaotic. While still a teenager, she met the love of her life. They were wed at 20, and the first of three children followed shortly. Jetté Knox finally had the stability she craved--or so it seemed. Their middle child struggled with depression and avoided school. The author was unprepared when the child she knew as her son came out as transgender at the age of eleven. Jetté Knox became an ardent advocate for trans rights.
                For many years, the author had coped with her spouse's moodiness, but that chronic unhappiness was taking a toll on their marriage. A little over a year after their child came out, her partner also came out as transgender. Knowing better than most what would lie ahead, Jetté Knox searched for positive examples of marriages surviving transition. When she found no role models, she determined that her family would become one.
                The shift was challenging, but slowly the family members noticed that they were becoming happier and more united. Love Lives Here is a story of transition, frustration, support, acceptance, and, of course, love.

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 15 Feb 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    Spanning three continents, Butter Honey Pig Bread tells the interconnected stories of three Nigerian women: Kambirinachi and her twin daughters, Kehinde and Taiye. Kambirinachi believes that she is an Ogbanje, or an Abiku, a non-human spirit that plagues a family with misfortune by being born and then dying in childhood to cause a human mother misery. She has made the unnatural choice of staying alive to love her human family but lives in fear of the consequences of her decision.
                Kambirinachi and her two daughters become estranged from one another because of a trauma that Kehinde experiences in childhood, which leads her to move away and cut off all contact. She ultimately finds her path as an artist and seeks to raise a family of her own, despite her fear that she won't be a good mother. Meanwhile, Taiye is plagued by guilt for what her sister suffered and also runs away, attempting to fill the void of that lost relationship with casual flings with women. She eventually discovers a way out of her stifling loneliness through a passion for food and cooking.
                But now, after more than a decade of living apart, Taiye and Kehinde have returned home to Lagos. It is here that the three women must face each other and address the wounds of the past if they are to reconcile and move forward.
                For readers of African diasporic authors such as Teju Cole and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Butter Honey Pig Bread is a story of choices and their consequences, of motherhood, of the malleable line between the spirit and the mind, of finding new homes and mending old ones, of voracious appetites, of queer love, of friendship, faith, and above all, family.

    Finalist for the 2020 Governor General’s Award for Fiction

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Tuesday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 24 Feb 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    Saskia and Jenny are twins who are alike only in appearance. Saskia is a hard-working grad student whose interests are solely academic, while Jenny, an interior designer, is glamourous, thrill-seeking, capricious and narcissistic. Still, when Jenny is severely injured in an accident, Saskia puts her life on hold to be with her sister.
                Sara and Mattie are sisters with a difficult relationship. Mattie, the younger sister, is affectionate, curious and intellectually disabled. As soon as Sara is able, she leaves home, in pursuit of a life of the mind and the body: she loves nothing more than fine wines, sensual perfumes, and expensive clothing.

                But when their mother dies, Sara inherits the duty of caring for her sister. Arriving at the house one day, she finds out that Mattie has married Robert, her wealthy mother's handyman. Though Mattie seems happy, Sara cannot let this go, forcing the annulment of the marriage and the banishment of Robert. With him out of the picture, though, she has no choice but to become her sister's keeper, sacrificing her own happiness and Mattie's too. When Robert turns up again, another tragedy happens. The waves from these events eventually engulf Sara and Saskia, sisters in mourning, in a quest for revenge.

    Nominated for the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 15 Mar 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

                A deeply affecting portrait of a long partnership and a clear-eyed account of the impact of a serious illness, writing as consolation, and the enduring significance of poetry from one of Canada's most celebrated voices.
                When we ran off together in 1978, abandoning our marriages and leaving wreckage in our wake, I was a promising writer, Patrick had just won the Governor General's Award. I was so happy for him, and I've continued to be every time an honour comes his way, but I knew if I didn't grow, if I remained merely someone who showed potential, we wouldn't last. I swore I wouldn't play the dutiful wife, cheerleader, and muse of the great male writer, and he didn't envision a partner like that. We aspired to flourish together and thrive in words and books and gardens.
                When Lorna Crozier and Patrick Lane met at a poetry workshop in 1976, they had no idea that they would go on to write more than forty books between them, balancing their careers with their devotion to each other, and to their beloved cats, for decades. Then, in January 2017, their life together changed unexpectedly when Patrick became seriously ill. Despite tests and the opinions of many specialists, doctors remained baffled. There was no diagnosis and no effective treatment plan. The illness devastated them both.
                During this time, Lorna turned to her writing as a way of making sense of her grief and for consolation. She revisited her poems, tracing her own path as a poet along with the evolution of her relationship with Patrick. The result is an intimate and intensely moving memoir about the difficulties and joys of creating a life with someone and the risks and immense rewards of partnership. At once a spirited account of the past and a poignant reckoning with the present, it is, above all, an extraordinary and unforgettable love story.
                Told with unflinching honesty and fierce tenderness, Through the Garden is a candid, clear-eyed portrait of a long partnership and an acknowledgement, a tribute, and a gift.

    Finalist for the 2020 Hilary Weston Writer’s Trust Prize for Non-fiction

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Tuesday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 31 Mar 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    Nanurjuk, “the bear-spirited one,” is hunting for seals on Hudson Bay, where ice never lasts more than one season. For her and her young, everything is in flux.
                From the top of the world, Hudson Bay looks like an enormous paw print on the torso of the continent, and through a vast network of lakes and rivers, this bay connects to oceans across the globe. Here, at the heart of everything, walks Nanurjuk, or Nanu, one polar bear among the six thousand that traverse the 1.23 million square kilometers of ice and snow covering the bay.
                For millennia, Nanu’s ancestors have roamed this great expanse, living, evolving, and surviving alongside human beings in one of the most challenging and unforgiving habitats on earth. But that world is changing. In the Arctic’s lands and waters, oil has been extracted—and spilled. As global temperatures have risen, the sea ice that Nanu and her young need to hunt seal and fish has melted, forcing them to wait on land where the delicate balance between them and their two-legged neighbors has now shifted.
                This is the icescape that author and geographer James Raffan invites us to inhabit in Ice Walker. In precise and provocative prose, he brings readers inside Nanu’s world as she treks uncertainly around the heart of Hudson Bay, searching for nourishment for the children that grow inside her. She stops at nothing to protect her cubs from the dangers she can see—other bears, wolves, whales, human beings—and those she cannot.
                By focusing his lens on this bear family, Raffan closes the gap between humans and bears, showing us how, like the water of the Hudson Bay, our existence—and our future—is tied to Nanu’s. He asks us to consider what might be done about this fragile world before it is gone for good. Masterful, vivid, and haunting, Ice Walker is an utterly unique piece of creative nonfiction and a deeply affecting call to action. 

    In 2020, James Raffan was named by Canadian Geographic as one of the “90 most influential explorers in the nation’s recorded history.”

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 12 Apr 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    It’s Northern Ontario in 1972, and seven-year-old Clara’s teenage sister Rose has just run away from home. At the same time, a strange man – Liam – drives up to the house next door, which he has just inherited from Mrs. Orchard, a kindly old woman who was friendly to Clara and relied on the girl to feed her cat Moses.

                A Town Called Solace follows Clara and her fractured family - a sister who is missing and parents who won’t ever tell her the truth; Liam’s escape from a mid-life crisis in this crumbling house which he was given unexpectedly by a woman he hasn’t seen since he was five; and Mrs Orchards’ final days in hospital, as her memories spiral back to the real mystery at the heart of this novel – what happened between her and Liam so many years ago.
                As these characters, who lives are joined by fate in ways they don't yet understand, reckon with personal crises and tragic pasts, we see that change and, for some, a new life is possible. By turns gripping and heart-warming, A Town Called Solace carefully uncovers the layers of grief, remorse and love that connect families, both the ones we're born into and the ones we choose, and steadily builds towards an assured, affecting and uplifting ending. It’s a beautiful portrait of a small town, a little girl and an exploration of childhood.

    Ben McNally will interview Mary Lawson.

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Tuesday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 28 Apr 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    Winner of the 2018 HarperCollins/UBC Prize for Best New Fiction Michelle Good's FIVE LITTLE INDIANS, told from the alternating points of view of five former residential school students as they struggle to survive in 1960s Vancouver—one finding her way into the dangerous world of the American Indian movement; one finding unexpected strength in motherhood; and one unable to escape his demons - and the bonds of friendship that sustain them, inspired by the author's experiences.

    Winner of the 2020 Governor General’s Prize for Fiction and the 2018 HarperCollins/UBC Prize for Best New Fiction

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 10 May 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    Chasing Painted Horses has a magical, fable-like quality. It is the story of four unlikely friends who live in Otter Lake, a reserve north of Toronto. Ralph and his sister, Shelley, live with their parents. On the cusp of becoming teenagers, they and their friend William befriend an odd little girl, from a dysfunctional family. Danielle, a timid 10 year old girl, draws an amazing, arresting image of a horse that draws her loose group of friends into her fantasy world. But those friends are not ready for what that horse may mean or represent. It represents everything that’s wrong in the girl’s life and everything she wished it could be. And the trio who meet her and witness the creation of the horse, are left trying to figure out what the horse means to the girl, and later to them. And how to help the shy little girl.


    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Tuesday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 26 May 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    A journalist in Washington, DC, Liz has turned lemons into lemonade after her husband walked out on her a decade ago. She likes her life—she’s the editor of My Turn, a daily column in which readers write about their lives, has a few romantic nibbles—some better than others—a good relationship with her teen-aged son, and has come to terms with the shock and heartbreak of her divorce. 

                Or so she thinks. One day at work, she receives a submission for the column she can’t ignore, because it’s written by her ex-husband’s current wife—AKA the other woman. It is the beginning of an unexpected correspondence between the two women—but only Liz knows the truth about their connection. Could it be she still cares? How far will she take this unusual relationship? And what happens if the truth comes out?


    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 14 Jun 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    Klara and the Sun, the first novel by Kazuo Ishiguro since he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, tells the story of Klara, an Artificial Friend with outstanding observational qualities, who, from her place in the store, watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse, and of those who pass on the street outside. She remains hopeful that a customer will soon choose her.
                Klara and the Sun is a thrilling book that offers a look at our changing world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator, and one that explores the fundamental question: What does it mean to love? 

    Professor Suanne Kelman will deliver a lecture on Klara and the Sun.

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Tuesday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

    • 23 Jun 2022
    • 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
    • Online

    When Julia Zarankin saw her first red-winged blackbird at the age of thirty-five, she didn’t expect that it would change her life. Recently divorced and auditioning hobbies during a stressful career transition, she stumbled on birdwatching, initially out of curiosity for the strange breed of humans who wear multi-pocketed vests, carry spotting scopes and discuss the finer points of optics with disturbing fervour.

                What she never could have predicted was that she would become one of them. Not only would she come to identify proudly as a birder, but birding would ultimately lead her to find love, uncover a new language and lay down her roots.

    This Lecture is part of the 2021-22 Literary Lecture Series, a popular series has been described as a cross between a traditional book club and a university course without exams. Registration for this event is  restricted to registration for the Thursday Subscription Series (available here), or the full subscriptions series (available here). Please note that late purchasers of the series will be provided all videos released before the date of purchase. 

Past events

18 Oct 2021 Life Drawing Session Oct 18, 2021
17 Oct 2021 Online Reception- Luminous
12 Oct 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Jennifer Robson: Our Darkest Night
2 Oct 2021 Luminous- Reception
23 Sep 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Janie Chang: The Library Of Legends
14 Sep 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Michael Christie: Greenwood
11 Sep 2021 Encounter- Reception
15 Aug 2021 In The Company of Trees- Reception
10 Jun 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Olga Tokarczuk: Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead with Suanne Kelman.
8 Jun 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Helen Humphreys: Rabbit Foot Bill
29 May 2021 Reception for High Arctic Light: Wilding and cultivation
25 May 2021 Humanities Salon: The Gift of L’Arche with Beth Porter
13 May 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Linden MacIntyre: The Wake
11 May 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Jessica McDiarmid: Highway of Tears
2 May 2021 Reception- Self Portrait Show
25 Apr 2021 Mary Rezza Memorial Recital
23 Apr 2021 Alone Together: Concert with Art, Poetry and Dance
15 Apr 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Emma Donoghue: Pull of the Stars
13 Apr 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Ben Lerner: The Topeka School with Sandra Martin
30 Mar 2021 Dance Salon with Amy Bowring from Dance Collection Danse
29 Mar 2021 Reception- Secret Garden (video of event)
23 Mar 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Karma Brown: Recipe For a Perfect Wife
20 Mar 2021 Reception- Secret Garden
5 Mar 2021 Celebrating Beethoven
4 Mar 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Carla Gunn: Amphibian
25 Feb 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Derek Mascarenhas: Coconut Dreams
16 Feb 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Gil Adamson: The Ridgerunner
11 Feb 2021 Music Salon with Alison Melville
9 Feb 2021 Music Salon with Alison Melville
28 Jan 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Jesse Thistle: From the Ashes: My Story of Being Métis, Homeless and Finding My Way
26 Jan 2021 Literary Lecture Series- Mike Barnes: Be With: Letters to a Caregiver
26 Nov 2020 Literary Lecture Series- Cary Fagan: The Student
20 Nov 2020 Dance the Night Away
17 Nov 2020 Literary Lecture Series- Anthony de Sa: Children of the Moon
22 Oct 2020 Literary Lecture Series- Joan Thomas: Five Wives
18 Oct 2020 Luminous 2020 Small Group Reception (2)-RSVP required
6 Oct 2020 Literary Lecture Series- Steven Price: Lampedusa
4 Oct 2020 Luminous 2020 Online Reception
3 Oct 2020 Luminous 2020 Small Group Reception-RSVP required
24 Sep 2020 Literary Lecture Series- MG Vassanji: A Delhi Obsession
22 Sep 2020 Literary Lecture Series- K.D. Miller: Late Breaking
8 Aug 2020 Liminal Spaces Zoom Reception
1 Aug 2020 Liminal Spaces Zoom Reception

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